This Week in History

ON THIS DAY… SEPTEMBER 22-28

September 22 – AUTUMNAL EQUINOX

 

The autumn equinox is one of two days when all points
on Earth except the polar regions see the sunrise and
sunset at due east and due west. Nearly all latitudes see almost precisely 12 hrs of daylight &12 hrs of darkness.

 

September 23 – NATIONAL CHECKERS DAY

 

More dogs than presidents have lived in the White House. Though this day marks the day in history that Checkers the dog (President Nixon) stole the spotlight.

 

September 24 – SCHWENKFELDER THANKSGIVING

 

This (German) Thanksgiving event is the oldest
continuously observed Thanksgiving event in the United States. The traditional Thanksgiving celebrated at the end of November didn’t get its start until the Civil War ended.

 

September 25 – GHOST HUNTING DAY

 

National Ghost Hunting Day will kick off with a Shot-Gun start at The ScareFest in Lexington, Ky. To join in the coast-to-coast simultaneous hunt, find a satellite team near you! National ghost hunting societies will participate across the country in investigating local venues. Use #NationalGhostHuntingDay to share on social media

 

September 26 – GOLD STAR MOTHER’S DAY

 

Since World War I, the observance has provided a way to recognize and honor those who have lost a son or daughter who served our country on active duty with the United States Armed Forces.

 

September 27 – NATIONAL FAMILY DAY

 

You know what to do…  GATHER… and EAT… and LAUGH!

 

September 28 – VOTER REGISTRATION DAY

 

SEE PAGE 11 FOR LOCAL VOTER REGISTRATION INFO

 

Courtesy of nationaldaycalendar.com

September 22

 

1656: All female jury hear (and ultimately acquit) case of Judith Catchpole, accused of killing her child in Patuxent County, Maryland.

1756: Nassau Hall opens
at Princeton University.

1832: During his HMS
Beagle voyage Charles Dawin discovers a large number of fossils in Punta Alta, Argentina.

1955: On BBC radio Grace Archer is killed in a barn fire on Brookfield Farm – the BBC denies it was to spoil launch of rival network, ITV.

 

September 23

 

1806: Lewis and Clark
return to St Louis from
Pacific Northwest.

1889: Nintendo Koppai (Later Nintendo Company, Limited) founded by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce and market the playing card game Hanafuda.

1932: Abdulaziz Ibn Saud merges the Kingdom
of Nejd and Hejaz into the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

1949: Indian owner Bill Veeck holds funeral services to bury 1948 pennant.

1962: ABC’s first color
TV series – The Jetsons by Hanna-Barbera first broadcast .

 

September 24

 

1789: US Federal Judiciary Act passes, creating a six-person Supreme Court.

1853: 1st round-the-world trip by yacht (Cornelius
Vanderbilt).

1950: Operation Magic
Carpet concludes after
having transported 45,000 Yemenite Jews to Israel.

1952: American fast food restaurant chain “KFC”
[Kentucky Fried Chicken] opens its first franchise in Salt Lake City, Utah.

1957: “Jailhouse Rock” single released by Elvis Presley (Billboard Song of the Year 1957).

1970: Soviet space probe Luna 16 lands on earth after 1st unmanned round trip to moon.

 

September 25

 

1639: First printing press
in America.

1804: Twelfth Amendment to the US Constitution,
establishing the procedure for electing the President and Vice President, becomes effective.

1906: Leonardo Torres
Quevedo successfully. demonstrates the Telekino at Bilbao before a great crowd, guiding a boat from the shore, considered the birth of the remote control.

1926: Henry Ford announces an 8 hour, 5-day work week.

1939: Andorra and Germany sign a treaty ending WWI,
as Versailles Peace Treaty forgot to include Andorra.

 

September 26

 

1665: Height of the Great Plague of London as 7,165 people die throughout the previous week Drivers of death carts in London would go street-to-street extolling people to “bring out your dead” at the height of the London plague.

1772: New Jersey passes
bill requiring a license to practice medicine.

1872: The first Shriners Temple (called Mecca) was established in NYC.

1892: 1st public appearance of John Philip Sousa’s band (New Jersey).

1957: Leornard Bernstein,
Stephen Sondheim and
Jerome Robbins’ musical “West Side Story” premieres at the Winter Garden
Theater in NYC.

 

September 27

 

1066: William the Conqueror’s troops set sail from
Normandy for conquest of England.

1822: French scholar Jean-François Champollion announces he has deciphered Egyptian hieroglyphics using the Rosetta Stone.

1892: Book matches are patented by Diamond Match Company.

1905: The physics journal Annalen der Physik publishes Albert Einstein’s paper “Does the Inertia of a Body Depend Upon Its Energy Content?”, introducing the equation E=mc².

1916: 1st Native American Day celebrated, honoring American Indians.

 

September 28

 

1542: Explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo discovers California, at San Diego Bay, naming it San Miguel and claims it for Spain.

1785: Napoléon Bonaparte, aged 16, graduates from the elite École Militaire in Paris (42nd in a class of 51).

1887: Yellow River or Huáng Hé floods in China, killing between 900,000 and 2 million people, one of the deadliest natural disasters in history.

1928: 1st recording session in Nashville (Warmack’s Gully Jumpers).

1930: Lou Gehrig’s errorless streak ends at 885 consecutive games.